chescaleigh:

believeinrecovery:

A little table to how to get rid of all that negative self-talk. We have to learn look at the good in situations too, instead of dwelling on things we can’t change- because you know what? We may not be able to change what is happening but we CAN change how we view it! 

always reblog

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(via fixyourwritinghabits)

WHEN AUTHORS USE WAY TOO MUCH CLUMSILY STRUCTURED BACKSTORY

lifeasaneditor:

lifeintheslushpile:

dudeinpublishing:

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This Right Here!!

Absolutely agreed. 

iwhaleyou:

idontcareaboutyourblog:

One of the best visual representations of the double standards subjected to all women on a daily basis. Reconsider the next time you toss about the words in column 3.

this is important

iwhaleyou:

idontcareaboutyourblog:

One of the best visual representations of the double standards subjected to all women on a daily basis. Reconsider the next time you toss about the words in column 3.

this is important

image

(via theindependentwriter)

amelia-the-vampire-slayer:

findingmyrecovery:

You are not going in circles

You are making progress in a spiral. You do come back around to where you were at the start, since recovery and healing take time, but every time you come back around to that point you’re a little higher up because you’ve got more experience, more knowledge, and more strength.

You ARE making progress

I really needed to read this!!

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(via mind-of-a-writer)

casfallen:

Writing in my brain: Beautiful flowing sentences full of powerful phrases and enigmatically witty dialogue. 

Writing on the page: They did the thing and said some stuff. There was snark. 

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(via booksandpublishing)

The Importance of Mary Sue

geekmehard:

unwinona:

When I was in Ninth Grade, I won a thing.  

That thing, in particular, was a thirty dollar Barnes & Noble gift certificate.  I was still too young for a part-time job, so I didn’t have this kind of spending cash on me, ever.  I felt like a god.

Drunk with power, I fancy-stepped my way to my local B&N.  I was ready to choose new books based solely on the most important of qualities…BADASS COVER ART.  I walked away with a handful of paperbacks, most of which were horrible (I’m looking at you, Man-Kzin Wars III) or simply forgettable.  

One book did not disappoint.  I fell down the rabbit hole into a series that proved to be as badass as the cover art promised (Again, Man-Kzin Wars III, way to drop the ball on that one).  With more than a dozen books in the series, I devoured them.  I bought cassette tapes of ballads sung by bards in the stories.  And the characters.  Oh, the characters.  I loved them.  Gryphons, mages, but most importantly, lots of women.  Different kinds of women.  So many amazing women.  I looked up to them, wrote bad fiction that lifted entire portions of dialogue and character descriptions, dreamed of writing something that the author would include in an anthology.

This year I decided in a fit of nostalgia to revisit the books I loved so damn much.  I wanted to reconnect with my old friends…

…and I found myself facing Mary Sues.  Lots of them.  Perfect, perfect, perfect.  A fantasy world full of Anakin Skywalkers and Nancy Drews and Wesley Crushers.  I felt crushed.  I had remembered such complex, deep characters and didn’t see those women in front of me at all anymore.  Where were those strong women who kept me safe through the worst four years of my life?

Which led me to an important realization as I soldiered on through book after book.  That’s why I needed them.  Because they were Mary Sues.  These books were not written to draw my attention to all the ugly bumps and whiskers of the real world.  They were somewhere to hide.  I was painfully aware that I was being judged by my peers and adults and found lacking.  I was a fuckup.  And sometimes a fuckup needs to feel like a Mary Sue.  As an adult, these characters felt a little thin because they lacked the real world knowledge I, as an adult, had learned and earned.  But that’s the thing…these books weren’t FOR this current version of myself.   Who I am now doesn’t need a flawless hero because I’m comfortable with the idea that valuable people are also flawed.

There is a reason that most fanfiction authors, specifically girls, start with a Mary Sue.  It’s because girls are taught that they are never enough.  You can’t be too loud, too quiet, too smart, too stupid.  You can’t ask too many questions or know too many answers.  No one is flocking to you for advice.  Then something wonderful happens.  The girl who was told she’s stupid finds out that she can be a better wizard than Albus Dumbledore.  And that is something very important.  Terrible at sports?  You’re a warrior who does backflips and Legolas thinks you’re THE BEST.   No friends?  You get a standing ovation from Han Solo and the entire Rebel Alliance when you crash-land safely on Hoth after blowing up the Super Double Death Star.  It’s all about you.  Everyone in your favorite universe is TOTALLY ALL ABOUT YOU.

I started writing fanfiction the way most girls did, by re-inventing themselves.  

Mary Sues exist because children who are told they’re nothing want to be everything.  

As a girl, being “selfish” was the worst thing you could be.  Now you live in Narnia and Prince Caspian just proposed marriage to you.  Why?  Your SELF is what saved everyone from that sea serpent.  Plus your hair looks totally great braided like that.

In time, hopefully, these hardworking fanfiction authors realize that it’s okay to be somewhere in the middle and their characters adjust to respond to that.  As people grow and learn, characters grow and learn.  Turns out your Elven Mage is more interesting if he isn’t also the best swordsman in the kingdom.  Not everyone needs to be hopelessly in love with your Queen for her to be a great ruler.  There are all kinds of ways for people to start owning who they are, and embracing the things that make them so beautifully weird and complicated.

Personally, though, I think it’s a lot more fun learning how to trust yourself and others if you all happen to be riding dragons.

Mary Sues exist because children who are told they’re nothing want to be everything.

A girl making herself the hero of her own story is a radical act. Stop shaming girls for doing it. Stop shaming yourself for it. 

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(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Greatest sin of storytelling…

…is avoiding conflict.

You want your characters to be happy so much that any obstacle in their path is easily overcome.

You solve big dilemmas quickly and focus instead on minor disputes, blowing them up into bigger monsters than they’re worth.

You reduce the climax to a bunch of “that went better than expected” moments.

You don’t edit any of it out.

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Bam! Made my own skin chart with extensive research and white people not porcelain.

Bam! Made my own skin chart with extensive research and white people not porcelain.

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legit-writing-tips:

Appropriate.

legit-writing-tips:

Appropriate.

mygreatkingdom:

One of the best feelings ever: Finishing a good book.

One of the worst feelings ever: Finishing a good book.

(via fuckyeahreading)

4gifs:

Trying to get homework done. [via mrorangeguy]


WHY IS THIS SO ACCURATE???

4gifs:

Trying to get homework done. [via mrorangeguy]

WHY IS THIS SO ACCURATE???

(via mind-of-a-writer)

Class Notes: The Musical

—-
(Disclaimer: These are the literal so-bored-I-don’t-care notes I took in my Leadership/Management Class. No editing has been done for your comfort.)
—-

pretending to take notes by making noise with my laptop. it’s like being in the background of a hollywood movie

words lots of words. noise. look like i’m writing notes.

revenue money

loans words sharks factorings hmm this works. just write stuff he says, not like it matters

securitization money owed to company and put it into bond and sell it to pirates

if you don’t agree with the plan liquidate self into smoothie and drink up

enron was an energy utility company until it committed fraud— no one was there to screw in the light bulbs

strategic/ structured/ operational

when you become a manager of a company, stop listening to this guy. be your own boss. punch yourself in the face.

be someone who solves kvetching—nobel peace prize

text says what he just said. i think that’s called reading

be skilled at convincing people money

financial control. it’s BDSM with your dollars. whip it good

i don’t care. this is so bland and he’s not even trying to relate it to us. he doesn’t know where we’re coming from. we know business plans!
Budgets….
Budgets….

Budgets.

Let’s pay money to save money because we spend money to look at money

Honestly, I could be literally creating a transcript of his entire lecture and he’ll think I’ve been looking at cat videos

Let’s learn finance! Profit is bad. Wait. I just failed this game.

small companies play hopscotch with bigger companies, but the bigger companies don’t like losing, so they start breaking legs

Ow. my head hurts. guess it’s time to stop trying to be funny. Only so much humor juice in my sqooch.

History lesson about the Great Depression. I feel a great depression listening to this.

Here are some exciting bureaucratic examples: [file not approved]